Logomotion Einstein Match

FIRST was founded 1989 by Dean Kamen, an inventor, and an entrepreneur. It was founded with the intention of inspiring young people’s interest and participation in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics). The first FIRST competition was in 1992 with 28 teams competing in a high-school gym in New Hampshire. Now over 250,000 students compete all over the world.

Vision and mission

As said by Dean Kamen, the vision of FIRST is “to transform our culture by creating a world where science and technology are celebrated and where young people dream of becoming science and technology leaders.” FIRST inspires kids to look up to scientists and mathmaticians as they would movie stars and famous athletes. FIRST is sometimes referred to as the “Superbowl of the Smarts” or “a sport for the mind.” Many people are confused about how robotics can be compared to sports. They’re more similar than you might think. FIRST’s “Build Season” can be compared to a varsity sport’s season. Teams work rigorously for many hours each day preparing for competitions. The competition atmosphere is similar to that of a sporting event. Teams compete against each other while fans watch on from the bleachers. The biggest difference between FIRST and sports, is that robots are actually competing, rather than humans.

FIRST’s mission is to inspire young people to be science and technology leaders, by engaging them in exciting mentor-based programs that build science, engineering and technology skills, that inspire innovation, and that foster well-rounded life capabilities including self-confidence, communication, and leadership.

Gracious Professionalism and Coopertition

“Gracious Professionalism” is a term that was coined by Dr. Woodie Flowers. Someone who is a “gracious professional” competes and wants to win, but treats others with respect in the process. It is described as a comfortable blend of knowledge, competition, and empathy. Coopertition is “displaying unqualified kindness and respect in the face of fierce competition.” Teams should help and respect each other, even as competitors.

FIRST has programs for all ages. There are two FIRST lego leagues, a FIRST tech challenge, and the FIRST robotics competitions. All of these competitions teach kids the values of FIRST.

FLL 

The youngest can participate in Junior FIRST LEGO League (JFLL) and FIRST LEGO League (FLL).

JFLL is intended for ages 6-9 (K-3) and allows kids to:
-Design and build a challenge-related model using LEGO components.
-Create a Show-Me poster and practice presentation skills.
-Explore challenges facing today’s scientists.
-Discover real-world math and science.
-Begin developing employment and life skills.
-Choose to participate in events and celebrations.
-Engage in team activities guided by FLL Core Values.

FLL, which is for students 9-14 (grades 4-8), allows students to:
-Strategize, design, build, program, and test a robot using LEGO MINDSTORMS technology.
-Create innovative solutions for challenges facing today’s scientists as part of their research project.
-Apply real-world math and science concepts.
-Develop employment and life skills including critical thinking, time management, collaboration, and communication while becoming more self confident.
-Become involved in their local and global community.
-Choose to participate in official tournaments and local events.
-Qualify for an invitation to World Festival.
-Engage in team activities guided by FLL Core Values.

FTC

FIRST Tech Challenge (FTC) , like FRC is for students ages 14-18 (grades 9-12). FTC is like FRC, but on a smaller scale. FTC teams usually have about ten students, and their kits are reusable from year to year. FTC is a more affordable option. Students who compete in FRC are encouraged to fundraise, while FTC teams don’t have a big need to do so. FTC participants get the opportunity to:
-Design, build, and program robots.
-Apply real-world math and science concepts.
-Develop problem-solving, organizational, and team-building skills.
-Compete and cooperate in alliances at tournaments.
-Earn a place in the World Championship.
-Qualify for more than $7 million in college scholarships.

FRC

FIRST Robotics Competition (FRC), for students ages 14-18 (grades 9-12), is the division that the Girls of Steel participate in. FRC Teams can have small to large teams, and are encouraged to fundraise year to year. FRC is the oldest and most elite division within the FIRST Competition. FRC participants get the opportunity to:
-Design, build, and program robots.
-Apply real-world math and science concepts.
-Develop problem-solving, organizational, and team-building skills.
-Compete and cooperate in alliances at tournaments.
-Earn a place in the World Championship.
-Qualify for more than $7 million in college scholarships.
-Learn technical and business techniques and skills.

Impact of FIRST

Recently, a study was done at Brandeis University that showed the FIRST students are:
-More than 3 times as likely to major in engineering.
-Roughly 10 times as likely to have had an apprenticeship, internship, or co-op job in their freshman year.
-Significantly more likely to expect to achieve a post graduate degree.
-More than twice as likely to expect to pursue a career in science and technology.
-Nearly 4 times as likely to expect to pursue a career specifically in engineering.
-More than twice as likely to volunteer in their communities.

This Post Has 13 Comments

    • Rosie Reply

      Thank you for contacting us. You are now on the email list and will receive the application for the FLL camp when it is released.
      -Girls of Steel

  1. Lisa Speranza Reply

    Can you also please include me on a distribution list for an application? My daughter is going into 7th grade in the fall, and attends the CMU Tech Nights program. Thanks so much for helping to empower our young women!

    • Rosie Reply

      Thank you for contacting us. We will be in touch soon.
      -Girls of Steel

    • Rosie Reply

      Thank you for contacting us. For more information about joining the FIRST LEGO League teams, write to us at .
      -Girls of Steel

  2. Dee Reply

    I have a few girls interested in hoing the Lego League at varying levels. I have a 7, 9 and 10 yr old. Please send me more information on this.

  3. Ayari Archundia Reply

    Hi, my daughter is 13 and would love to be a part of any summer program. Is it possible to submit an application from abroad? For a summer program? Could you please help tell me who would offer me more information?

    • Rosie Reply

      Hi!
      Thank you for contacting the Girls of Steel about our summer camps. The answer is “Yes, your daughter can join us at one of our 2017 summer camps!” One of our mentors will be in touch with you soon. Until then, please write to us at girlsofsteelrobotics@gmail.com if you have other questions.
      -Girls of Steel

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