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Media Articles
March 1, 2006 - IEEE Spectrum
"The idea is that eventually, scientists back on Earth won't need to send step-by-step instructions to the robot; if it spots a rock of particular interest, it will just mosey on over and investigate, instead of waiting for a human to tell it what to do."

January 21, 2006 - Science News
"The machine would spray a target area with the four dyes. Then, using a bright xenon flash to make the dyes fluoresce, a camera would take four pictures through each of four filters tuned to the wavelengths emitted by each dye."

January 1, 2006 - Popular Science
"I ask Warren-Rhodes who is the better Atacama biologist, she or ZoŽ. "I am," she says without missing a beat. "Iíve spent so much time in extreme deserts." And in a few years? "Oh, it will be like Kasparov playing IBMís Deep Blue. By game 6, Iím outta here!""

November 18, 2005 - The Chronicle of Higher Education
"The six-and-a-half-foot-wide rover looks like a jacked-up go-cart, with mountain-bike tires and solar panels on its back. A set of high-resolution cameras is mounted on a five-foot pole in the front, resembling an insect's antenna. Behind its removable fiberglass sides, the rover houses a dizzying array of circuitry, navigation equipment, and scientific instruments. The design is the result of 10 years of prototype testing at Carnegie Mellon's Robotics Institute."

November 7, 2005 - Pittsburgh Post-Gazzette
"'This is really the next step in terms of exploration,' said Nathalie A. Cabrol, a planetary scientist at NASA's Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, Calif., and lead scientist for the Life in the Atacama project. The Carnegie Mellon University robot showed that it not only could be a mobile platform for instruments, but can use its own rudimentary reasoning to make scientific discoveries."

November 1, 2005 - Popular Mechanics
"Its name is ZoŽ, Greek for ďlifeĒ--and it is for microscopic evidence of life that it prowls Chileís bone-dry Atacama Desert. A largely autonomous, solar-powered aluminum and carbon-fiber robot, ZoŽ is the creation of David Wettergreen and a team at the Carnegie Mellon Robotics Institute."

September 4, 2005 - Indy Star
"While the twin NASA rovers that have been exploring Mars are equipped mainly to search for signs of water, Zoe carries a wide variety of sensors and cameras."

August 29, 2005 - Orlando Sentinel
"Zoe is capable of navigating several kilometers a day, stopping periodically to deploy its instruments"

August 15, 2005 - Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
"Zoe, a solar-powered robot that sits on bicycle wheels, was built at CMU's Field Robotics Center and its main instrument, a fluorescent imaging camera, was developed by the university's Molecular Biosensor and Imaging Center."

August 14, 2005 - Physorg.com
"The search-for-life project was begun in 2003 under NASA's Astrobiology Science and Technology Program for Exploring Planets, or ASTEP, which concentrates on pushing the limits of technology to study life in harsh environments. "

August 14, 2005 - Astrobiology Magazine
"ZoŽ will visit a foggy coastal region, the dry Andean altiplano, and an area in the desert's arid interior that receives no precipitation for decades at a time. At these sites, the rover's activities will be guided remotely from an operations center in Pittsburgh where the researchers will characterize the environment, seek clear proof of life and map the distribution of various habitats."

August 12, 2005 - Science Daily
"Last year we learned that the Fluorescence Imager can detect organisms in this environment. This year we'll be able to see how densely an area is populated with organisms and map their distribution. We intend to have the robot make as many as 100 observations and make advances in procedural developments like how to decide where to explore."

August 11, 2005 - SpaceDaily
"Zoe's abilities represent the culmination of three years of work to determine the optimum design, software and instrumentation for a robot that can autonomously investigate different habitats."

August 10, 2005 - SpaceRef
"We have worked with rovers and individual instruments before, but Zoe is a complete system for life seeking. We are working toward full autonomy of each day's activities, including scheduling time and resource use, control of instrument deployment and navigation between study areas"

August 10, 2005 - ZDNet News
"Last year, the robot found signs of life in the harsh climate of the Atacama Desert, where life is barely discernable. Zoe is outfitted with scientific instruments to find and identify microorganisms, and then to characterize their habitats."

August 10, 2005 - CNET News.com
"Zoe and a team of researchers will leave in two weeks for a third and final mission to the Atacama Desert in Chile, where the robot will travel alone across about 110 miles in two months, studying the driest desert on Earth"

March 29, 2005 - New York Times
"The landscape looked lifeless. But satellite images from orbit identified geological formations containing minerals that microbes sometimes like to nestle in, and scientists dispatched a small rover to look at the rocks up close. Fluorescent dyes sprayed on the ground lit up, proclaiming the presence of proteins and DNA. The rover also detected chlorophyll, the energy-producing molecule of plants. And so scientists discovered life in Chile's Atacama Desert. [Free registration required]"

March 25, 2005 - Science Magazine
"[Ed. note: this link points to a PDF. You will need Adobe Acrobat Reader to view it. This link may also require registration at www.sciencemag.org.]""

March 19, 2005 - Slashdot.org
"The Atacama desert is thought to be similar to Mars; instruments similar to those used on the 1970s Viking missions have previously failed to detect life there."

March 18, 2005 - Embassy of the United States - Japan
"An automated exploration vehicle has enabled international scientists to remotely identify habitats and microbial life in tests in Chile's arid Atacama desert, one of Earthís harshest environments, according to a March 16 NASA press release."

March 18, 2005 - Robots.net
"During simulated missions, the robot was able to discovered and identify two forms of life: some visible lichens and some bacteria."

March 17, 2005 - News@Nature.com
"Scientists back in Pittsburgh sent commands to guide ZoŽ's exploration each day, but she relied on her own cameras and internal sensors to navigate the tough terrain. As she looked for signs of life, fellow researchers in the desert followed to check her results. "There is not a single example of the rover giving a false positive," says Edwin Minkley, a biologist on the Carnegie Mellon team."

March 17, 2005 - Astronomy Magazine
"During the mission, a remote science team at Carnegie Mellon in Pittsburgh guided the rover. At the Atacama site, another team gathered samples studied by the rover. These samples were returned to a lab for examination, where all samples identified by the rover possessed bacteria."

March 17, 2005 - USINFO.state.gov - Washington File
"The findings may bode well for future Mars missions, said scientists from the NASA Ames Research Center, who led the investigation. Scientists from Universidad Catůlica del Norte in Chile, the British Antarctic Survey, and the International Research School of Planetary Sciences in Italy also participated in the field experiment."

March 17, 2005 - Innovations Report
"The first phase of the ASTEP project began in 2003 when a solar-powered robot named Hyperion, also developed at Carnegie Mellon, was taken to the Atacama as a research test bed. Scientists conducted experiments with Hyperion to determine the optimum design, software and instrumentation for a robot that would be used in more extensive experiments conducted in 2004 and in 2005. ZoŽ, a brand new robot, was developed in response to what was learned in 2003. In the final year of the project, plans call for ZoŽ, equipped with a full array of scientific instruments, to operate autonomously as it travels 50 kilometers over a two-month period."

March 16, 2005 - NASA News Release
"A group of scientists announced today that they identified habitats and microbial life using a rover in Chile's arid Atacama desert, one of the harshest environments on Earth, and that their findings may bode well for future missions to Mars."

March 16, 2005 - NewScientist.com
"In order to simulate operating a rover on Mars, the vehicle was controlled remotely by scientists in Pittsburgh. The controllers were not told exactly where it had "landed" - only that it was somewhere within a large "landing ellipse"."

March 16, 2005 - Discovery Channel Canada - Daily Planet
"[Ed. note: this link points to a page on which you can view a video from the Discovery Channel's Daily Planet program. Find the piece titled "New rover finds lifeÖon Earth" near the top of the page and click on the video button nearby.]"

March 16, 2005 - SpaceMart
"The "Life in the Atacama" 2004 field season Ė from August to mid-October Ė was the second phase of a three-year program whose goal is to understand how life can be detected by a rover that is being controlled by a remote science team."

March 15, 2005 - Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
"The solar-powered Zoe rover explored two areas of the Atacama -- a coastal area where fog or other precipitation is common and a drier area farther inland. The lichens that Zoe discovered in the coastal area were pretty obvious, Waggoner said. But in the drier, interior portion of the Atacama, Zoe found only microscopic bacteria."

March 15, 2005 - Carnegie Mellon Today
"Current Mars expeditions raise the tantalizing possibility that there may be life somewhere on the red planet. But just how will future missions find it? A system being developed by Carnegie Mellon scientists could provide the answer."

March 15, 2005 - MSNBC News
"ZoŽ, a four-wheeled automaton built to scan for living organisms, found evidence of bacterial colonies and lichens living among the rocks of Chileís Atacama Desert."

March 15, 2005 - SpaceRef.com
"Life is barely discernible over most areas of the Atacama, but the rover's instruments were able to detect lichens and bacterial colonies in two areas: a coastal region with a more humid climate and an interior, very arid region less hospitable to life."

March 15, 2005 - UniverseToday.com
"In the final year of the project, plans call for ZoŽ, equipped with a full array of instruments, to operate autonomously as it travels 50 kilometers over a two-month period."

March 15, 2005 - Space.com
"Nobody was surprise to find life there, but with the harsh conditions and sparse biological activity, the feat is likened to finding microbial creatures on Mars if any exists there."

March 15, 2005 - PhysOrg.com
"This marks the first time a rover-based automated technology has been used to identify life in this harsh region, which serves as a test bed for technology that could be deployed in future Mars missions."

March 15, 2005 - EurekAlert
"Waggoner and his colleagues have designed a life detection system equipped to detect fluorescence signals from sparse life forms, including those that are mere millimeters in size. Their fluorescence imager, which is located underneath the rover, detects signals from chlorophyll-based life, such as cyanobacteria in lichens, and fluorescent signals from a set of dyes designed to light up only when they bind to one of the following Ė nucleic acid, protein, lipid or carbohydrate Ė all molecules of life."

March 13, 2005 - Astrobiology Magazine
"A unique rover-based life detection system developed by Carnegie Mellon University scientists has found signs of life in Chile's Atacama Desert, according to results being presented at the 36th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference March 14-18 in Houston."

September 25, 2004 - Spaceflight Now
"'These robots and science payloads will be a wonderful precursor to human exploration and excellent "astronaut/astrobiology assistants" when the time comes for human missions,' she [Nathalie Cabrol] added."

September 25, 2004 - Space News Blog
"The NASA funded researchers are studying the Atacama Desert, described as the most arid region on Earth, to understand the desert as a habitat that represents one of the limits of life on Earth."

September 24, 2004 - NASA
"Scientists using EventScope, a remote experience browser developed by researchers at Carnegie Mellon's Studio for Creative Inquiry, will guide Zoe. EventScope enables scientists to experience the Atacama environment through the eyes and various sensors of the rover. The public can access the same kind of data experienced by scientists by downloading the EventScope interface from the Internet..."

September 24, 2004 - MarsToday.com
"The NASA funded researchers are studying the Atacama Desert, described as the most arid region on Earth, to understand the desert as a habitat that represents one of the limits of life on Earth. The project, part of NASA's Astrobiology Science and Technology Program for Exploring Planets, involves technology experiments to test robotic capabilities for mobility, autonomy and science."

September 24, 2004 - SpaceNewsFeed
"The NASA funded researchers are studying the Atacama Desert, described as the most arid region on Earth, to understand the desert as a habitat that represents one of the limits of life on Earth. The project, part of NASA's Astrobiology Science and Technology Program for Exploring Planets, involves technology experiments to test robotic capabilities for mobility, autonomy and science."

September 14, 2004 - El Mercurio.com
"With the calibration of the equipment, the harvesting of the first land samples and the taking of photographs in the Salar Grande (89 kilometers to the south of Iquique), the second stage of the Life in Atacamap roject began. [article in Spanish, translation by Babelfish]"

August 19, 2004 - The Albuquerque Tribune
"Unlike Hyperion, Zoe will also carry the experimental fluorescent imager on board. The device has been redesigned to include an ultraviolet flash unit, which may allow it to detect faint fluorescent signals during the day..."

August 18, 2004 - MSNBC News
"ZoŽ will be programmed to do spot checks of target sites, as well as inch-by-inch surveys of a stretch of desert. For this year's test, Waggoner will be standing behind ZoŽ, spritzing the fluorescent dyes onto rocks and soil for ZoŽ to check with its camera. Eventually, the spritzers will be built into the rover."

August 16, 2004 - Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
"Though the science team will direct Zoe to places of interest, the robot itself will make most of the detailed decisions, such as how to get from place to place, and will be able to travel a kilometer or more without human intervention."

August 12, 2004 - SpaceDaily.com
"The Atacama team also will conduct a series of robotic science investigations in which Zoe will be sent to visit promising locations and deploy instruments able to identify life forms. During these investigations, the rover's activities will be guided remotely from an operations center in Pittsburgh."

August 10, 2004 - SpaceRef.com
"'Our goal is to make genuine discoveries about the limits of life on Earth and to create technology that can be applied to future NASA missions,' said Wettergreen. 'This will be the second of three field experiments in the Atacama. Each time our robot is better able to use sensing and intelligence to find land forms or environmental conditions that could harbor life.'"

August 10, 2004 - Mellon College of Science
"For this yearís mission, the scientists are creating an extensive database of their findings. On a typical day, the rover will wake up and follow a path designated the previous day by the remote operations science team located in Pittsburgh."

August 5, 2004 - CNN.com
"By understanding the absolute limits of life on Earth, scientists hope their search for life on other planets such as Mars will be more likely to succeed."

August 5, 2004 - CMU.edu - Media Advisory
"ZoŽ will be guided by a science team using EventScope, a remote experience browser developed by researchers at the Studio for Creative Inquiry in Carnegie Mellon's College of Fine Arts. It enables scientists and the public to experience the Atacama environment through the eyes and various sensors of the rover. A science operations control room at the Remote Experience and Learning Lab in Pittsburgh will be active in September and October while ZoŽ is in the field."

July 11, 2004 - Pittsburgh Tribune-Review
"Equipped with fluorescent dyes and microscopes, Zoe will look for life in the desert as a possible prequel to exploring Mars."

August 4, 2003 - Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
"Hyperion, originally designed for a different experiment, exceeded its performance goals during the outing, traveling more than 12 miles autonomously."

April 4, 2003 - BBC News
"Based on this year's experience, next year's robot should be able to travel about 50 km. The target for the 2005 expedition is 200 km, traversing contrasting areas where life is abundant and areas where life has not been detected."
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